Episode 8: Peter Paine

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Juriste, homme d’affaire, philanthrope et francophile, Peter S. Paine est l’invité du 8ème épisode de Révolution Bilingue. Cet Américain, amoureux de la langue française depuis près de 70 ans, a fait de son bilinguisme une force à chaque étape de sa carrière. Tour à tour, Peter Paine a défendu la compagnie Peugeot aux États-Unis, sauvé de la faillite le Fort Carillon, sur l’Hudson, et soutenu de nombreux projets environnementaux autour du Lac Champlain.
Écoutez l’épisode ici, sur le site de French Morning ou sur iTunes Podcast.
Le podcast “Révolution Bilingue” est proposé par French Morning avec le soutien de CALEC (Center for the Advancement of Languages, Education, and Communities).

Families in Global Transition

 

Families in Global Transition is a welcoming forum for globally mobile individuals, families, and those working with them. This nonprofit organization promotes cross-sector connections for sharing research and developing best practices that support the growth, success and well-being of people crossing cultures around the world. I was invited to give a presentation about bilingual education and my vision for a future of education in two languages.

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The Influence of American Foundations on Universities in Africa. Towards an Anglicized World?

In the context of higher education, the primary language of instruction—the language that is used in class and to conduct research—is an important but complex factor. In many countries, the language of instruction varies between the primary, secondary, and university levels. Unsurprisingly, American foundations investing in higher education on the African continent target institutions where English is the primary language of instruction. English is the primary language of instruction at more than 90% of the institutions of higher education that have received grants from American foundations; the equivalent figures for French and for Arabic are 4% and 3%, respectively. I was thrilled to present on this issue during the Comparative and International Education Society’s annual conference in San Francisco in a panel chaired by legendary scholar, Robert Arnove.

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